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We name a person, place, thing, or idea.

A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea.

Person:

Mr. Jenkins is the happiest teacher around.

Place:

They went to Oklahoma for their field trip.

Thing:

There is a small stack of pennies on my dresser.

Idea:

We have all fought for equality.

Common
Nouns


A common noun names a general person, place, thing, or idea.

When I was in the restaurant, I asked a lady what she knew about a volcano.

Proper
Nouns


A proper noun names a specific person, place, thing, or idea.

When I was in Burger King, I asked Lucy what she knew about Krakatoa.

Concrete
Nouns


A concrete noun names a person, place, or thing that can be perceived by one or more of the five senses.

The receptionist yelled at me when I brought my furry platypus to the museum.

Abstract
Nouns


An abstract noun is an idea or quality that can not be perceived by any of the five senses.

It is always best to live with honor and courage in your heart.

Compound
Nouns


A compound noun is two or more words combined to make a single noun that names a person, place, thing, or idea. It can be one single word, two words, or words connected by hyphens.

My mother-in-law took me to the swimming pool after a dessert of strawberry shortcakes.

Collective
Nouns


A collective noun is a singular noun that names a group.

Our band went to the zoo to see the school of fish but an armory of aardvarks had escaped, so they closed the zoo and called in a squad of police.